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HTML5 Bitcoin Wallet

HTML5 Bitcoin Wallet

I think Apple is starting to have a love-hate relationship with HTML5. When Apple bans an app in the App store or gets greedy, developers seem to always turn to HTML5. Do you remember the time Apple started requiring third-party app developers to sell any available content inside their apps instead of linking out to browser based items on a website? Apple wanted their 30 percent and a HTML5 Instant Reader was born. Well now Apple is having issues with bitcoin wallet apps. High-profile bitcoin wallet providers such as Coinbase and Blockchain have seen their apps removed from the App store. It was only in the past couple of days that Apple approved the bitWallet iOS App which without workarounds is almost useless because the bitcoin sending function is blocked. It’s kind of like having a traditional wallet full of cash that was glued together by your little brother. Sure, you can get the money out eventually but it will require some time and a speech to your brother about how glueing a strangers wallet together may result in a wedgie.

There is a HTML5 bitcoin wallet app outside of Apple’s sphere of influence called Coinpunk. It is an open source bitcoin wallet service that you can run on your own server. The user interface is entirely written in HTML with JavaScript and the backend is built with Node.js. The code is written to provide future support for more bitcoin node clients, including upcoming SPV-based wallets that require less resources to work. You can also accept payments via a QR code, do QR code scanning, and enjoy two-factor authentication.

Watch this HTML5 bitcoin wallet app being used to buy a Subway sandwich in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Coinpunk is trying to raise funds to further the project on Indiegogo, an international crowdfunding platform. There are less than 48 hours to go on the campaign. They say they want to “prove that you can make 100% open source HTML5/JS bitcoin wallets that work just as well as proprietary native ones, if not better.”

I do not own any bitcoin and that makes me sad. I want start though and have created a bitcoin wallet where you can send me bitcoins: 19BxpcYMh44PXbR3ZDv7UcffasKnk1MHn3

Why would you send me bitcoins?

  • Support the HTML5 Blog
  • Advertise. If you send me 1 bitcoin or more you can advertise on this site for 3 months. It will be a 125×125 ad in the right sidebar. Just e-mail me the transaction id and ad details at stanbyme@html5blog.com, and I’ll set it up for you.
  • So that my lame HTML5 Halloween costume will look better this year.

Here is the QR code for my bitcoin wallet:

QR Code for HTML5 Blog

Thank you!

Reduce the File Size of Your Animated Gifs Using HTML5 Video

Gfycat logo design - A gif and HTML5 video hosting service.

I built a lot of animated gifs for clients when I first started working online. The file size of my gifs could get rather large even after optimizing them in Fireworks so I would sometimes need to make the same thing in Flash. Flash was good for reducing the file size of my gif animations but using it opened up a whole host of other problems. So when I came across a new website called Gfycat that claimed to be able to reduce the file size of an animated gif by turing it into a HTML5 video, I had to try it.


You should see what I created the other day as an animated gif or HTML5 video above. If only my previous paragraph is showing, please refresh the page. If you see an animated countdown that never ends, please refresh the page. If you see floaters, please visit your eye doctor and then refresh the page.

I embedded my HTML5 Blog animation using the Gfycat embed feature which is still in the early alpha stage. There are some hiccups using the embed feature. The biggest one I found was that on mobile devices the gif will show instead of the HTML5 video. If my embedded animation is not working for you, please visit it on the Gfycat website here: http://gfycat.com/YoungDisfiguredBonobo. That link was randomly generated. Yes, “YoungDisfiguredBonobo” is not my handy work. Gfycat URLs consist of this structure: AdjectiveAdjectiveAnimal. I didn’t know what a bonobo was so when I first saw it I thought the link was “YoungDisfiguredBono”. It gave me a chuckle.

Funny HTML5 Video Names automatically generated by Gfycat

Gfycat did do a good job at reducing the size of the animated gifs I uploaded. The HTML5 Blog animation I made went from a size of 3.2 MB as an animated gif to 917 KB as an HTML5 video. Results will vary. There is an example on the Gfycat website of a 4.5 MB animated gif that when optimized into an HTML5 video, the size went to a spectacular 286 KB. The video version is about 16 times smaller. Dramatic file size reductions like these will certainly speed up websites, minimize bandwidth usage, and help save the manatees.

Screenshot of HTML5 video controls after it has been converted from an animated gif.

In addition to optimization, animated gifs transformed into HTML5 videos via Gfycat have some swell features. Videos can be played in slow motion and reverse. They also can be sped up, paused, and analyzed frame by frame. Using the controls underneath the video will change the link on Gfycat, which can then be shared. You can see the video I made in reverse using this link: http://gfycat.com/YoungDisfiguredBonobo#?direction=reverse

Did I convince you to try it? Read More…

HTML5 unleashed: EWC Presenter is one app for all your visual content needs

Banner Presenter

EWC Presenter is a new HTML5 based web application that allows everyone to easily create content in HTML5; we’re talking about presentations, infographics, banner ads, animations and virtually all other visual content in between.

But before getting into the nuts and bolts of this app let’s remember the days not too long ago when you would visit a site and your browser would warn you to download a later version of Flash or Silverlight (Microsoft’ answer to Flash). For content publishers (ex. designers and developers would have to spend extra time to adjust the same content for number of browsers, displays and devices because content had to be optimized for different flavors of various browsers in particular Internet Explorer?). Those days are over thanks to HTML5, but the challenge to utilize HTML5 has been reserved for advanced level designers and developers; at least until now.

A quick look back: not so easy to use, or is it?
Unless you have been completely disconnected from new trends on the internet, by now you know that HTML5 is quickly becoming the standard for creating all types of content that is supported by virtually any device (web, tablet and smart phones) and any platform be it Mac or Windows. This is a huge victory for both consumers and content creators who have been waiting a long time for this level of standardization.

HTML5 is an extension of HTML, the code that is the foundation of web page code and and combined with CSS3 (3rd iteration of Cascading Style Sheets) it serves as the fabric and glue that hold your content together to form a web page. You may not know HTML code, but you stare at tens if not hundreds of pages per day rendered in HTML including this one.

Most of us just don’t have the time or experience to have to deal with code and would rather just visually form our content the same way we consume it. This is one of a few reasons why in the past Flash became so popular among designers. Designers don’t like to code; they are visual beings and Flash was a tool that virtually eliminated the need to code and allowed creating interactive content more easier than ever before. Read More…